AMIC® Chondro-Gide® in the Hip

Chondral defects in the hip due to trauma, osteonecrosis, labral tears, and other causes can result in severe dysfunction and joint pain. Femoralacetabular impingement (FAI) is another common cause of localized cartilage defects and damage requiring hip arthroscopy1.

 

Delay or Avoidance of Total Hip Replacement Now Possible

Damaged cartilage has limited capacity to heal itself. If left untreated, the damage can worsen over time. With minimally-invasive arthroscopic treatment approaches for chondral defects in the hip, preserving the hip-joint cartilage and delaying or possibly even avoiding total hip replacement surgery1 is now possible.

 

AMIC® Chondro-Gide® for Effective Cartilage Repair

AMIC® Chondro-Gide® is a minimally-invasive 1-step procedure that uses  bone marrow stimulation combined with Chondro-Gide to repair cartilage defects of all sizes.

Developed by Geistlich Surgery in collaboration with leading surgeons in Europe, AMIC® Chondro-Gide® is an effective and cost-effective treatment2,3  for repairing damaged cartilage in the talus, alleviating or preventing pain, and slowing the progression of damage.

With its specially designed bilayer structure, Chondro-Gide® provides a protective environment that fosters the growth of new cartilage.4,5

  • Bio-derived, bilayer Collagen I/III membrane4
  • Biocompatible and naturally resorbed4
  • Easy to handle: supple and tear-resistant4
  • Can be glued or sutured into place4
  • Compatible with a range of tissue regeneration techniques6
  • One-step procedure4
  • Ready for use off the shelf4

 

 

AMIC® Hip Technique as Described by Dr. Fontana

 

AMIC in the Hip, Performed by Dr. Andrea Fontana

 

 

References

  1. MARQUEZ-LARA, A. et al., 2016, Arthroscopic Management of Hip Chondral Defects: A Systematic Review of the Literature. Arthroscopy: The Journal of Arthroscopic & Related Surgery. 2016. Vol. 32, no. 7, p. 1435-1443. DOI 10.1016/j.arthro.2016.01.058. Elsevier BV (Review).
  2. SCHIAVONE PANNI, A., et al. Good clinical results with autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis (AMIC) technique in large knee chondral defects. Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc, 2018 Apr 26(4):1130-36 (Clinical study).
  3. WALTHER, M., et al. Scaffold based reconstruction of focal full thickness talar cartilage defects. Clinical Research on Foot & Ankle, 2013, 1-5. (Clinical study).
  4. Geistlich Pharma AG data on file (Pre-clinical Study)
  5. GILLE, J., et al. Cell-Laden and Cell-Free Matrix-Induced-Chondrogenesis versus Microfracture for the Treatment of Articular Cartilage Defects: A Histological and Biomechanical Study in Sheep. Cartilage OnlineFirst, January 7, 2010, doi:10.1177/1947603509358721 (Pre-clinical study)
  6. KRAMER, J., et al. In vivo matrix-guided human mesenchymal stem cells. Cell Mol Life Sci, Mar 2006,  3(5), 616-626. (Clinical study)
  7. FONTANA, A. and DE GIROLAMO, L., 2015, Sustained 5-year benefit of autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis for femoral acetabular impingement-induced chondral lesions compared with microfracture treatment. The Bone & Joint Journal. 2015. Vol. 97-B, no. 5, p. 628-635. DOI 10.1302/0301-620x.97b5.35076. British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery (Clinical study).
  8. DE GIROLAMO, L., et al., Autologous Matrix-Induced Chondrogenesis (AMIC) and AMIC Enhanced by Autologous Concentrated Bone Marrow Aspirate (BMAC) Allow for Stable Clinical and Functional Improvements at up to 9 Years Follow-Up: Results from a Randomized Controlled Study. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2019. Vol. 8, no. 3, p. 392. DOI 10.3390/jcm8030392. MDPI AG (Clinical Study)
Dr. Sanja Saftic
International Product Manager